Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin - Holy Bible (First Edition, First Printing)

£195.00 

  • Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin - Holy Bible (First Edition, First Printing)
  • Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin - Holy Bible (First Edition, First Printing)
  • Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin - Holy Bible (First Edition, First Printing)
  • Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin - Holy Bible (First Edition, First Printing)
  • Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin - Holy Bible (First Edition, First Printing)
  • Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin - Holy Bible (First Edition, First Printing)
  • Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin - Holy Bible (First Edition, First Printing)

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  • Mack/AMC, 2013.
  • Hardcover.
  • First Edition, first printing.
  • 16.2 x 21.6cm.

Embossed hardcover no jacket as issued. Illustrated with 512 images from the Archive of Modern Conflict, London, imposed over the text of the King James Bible. 4 page booklet, printed in black on red paper, and featuring Adi Opher’s essay Divine violence, mounted into the inner rear cover.

Violence, calamity and the absurdity of war are recorded extensively within The Archive of Modern Conflict, the largest photographic collection of its kind in the world. For their most recent work, Holy Bible, Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin mined this archive with philosopher Adi Ophir’s central tenet in mind: that God reveals himself predominantly through catastrophe and that power structures within the Bible correlate with those within modern systems of governance.

The format of Broomberg and Chanarin’s illustrated Holy Bible mimics both the precise structure and the physical form of the King James Version. By allowing elements of the original text to guide their image selection, the artists explore themes of authorship, and the unspoken criteria used to determine acceptable evidence of conflict.

Inspired in part by the annotations and images Bertolt Brecht added to his own personal bible, Broomberg and Chanarin’s publication questions the clichés at play within the visual representation of conflict.

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