Max Pinckers & Quinten De Bruyn - LOTUS (Signed)

£36.00 

  • Max Pinckers & Quinten De Bruyn - LOTUS (Signed)
  • Max Pinckers & Quinten De Bruyn - LOTUS (Signed)
  • Max Pinckers & Quinten De Bruyn - LOTUS (Signed)
  • Max Pinckers & Quinten De Bruyn - LOTUS (Signed)
  • Max Pinckers & Quinten De Bruyn - LOTUS (Signed)
  • Max Pinckers & Quinten De Bruyn - LOTUS (Signed)
  • Max Pinckers & Quinten De Bruyn - LOTUS (Signed)
  • Max Pinckers & Quinten De Bruyn - LOTUS (Signed)
  • Max Pinckers & Quinten De Bruyn - LOTUS (Signed)
  • Max Pinckers & Quinten De Bruyn - LOTUS (Signed)
  • Max Pinckers & Quinten De Bruyn - LOTUS (Signed)

This product is currently sold out.

  • Signed copy, Hardcover, Edition of 3000
  • 195 x 270 mm, 152 pages
  • Full colour offset, Sewn bound, Published by Lyre/Self 2016

Excerpt from Our Ladies of the Flowers by Hans Theys
""Sometimes the photographs contain elements that seem to suggest a rapidity or improvisational quality, e.g. somebody who strokes a cat, the flying pigeons in the park or the ladyboy who seems to wipe her eyes. This peculiar quality adds a supplementary layer of ambiguity. Is the photograph staged? And if so, why? Of course, unpredictable or uncontrollable elements make a photograph come alive, but in this particular case the unpredictable elements are a means to approach real life despite the diligent set preparation, lighting and framing. If everything would be controlled, the photographs wouldn't be ambiguous: they would only depict a staged reality. Through working slowly and diligently, the photographers create a situation in which unexpected things can take place: birds can fly, a cat can pass or a person can pluck something from his or her eyelashes." - Hans Theys

In the series Lotus, Max Pinckers and Quinten De Bruyn document the world of transsexuals in Thailand. The gender crisis that the so-called ladyboys face is transformed into a visual metaphor about the identity crisis that contemporary documentary photography currently encounters, when it dares to reflect upon itself critically, and confront its paradoxes. The documentary photographer that captures reality as ‘a fly on thne wall’ can’t deny his or her directive and manipulative role any longer. The anonymity, the seeming absence, is merely a pose. The tableaux that the photographer captures are not lies, but enfold themselves within the studio that he or she creates from reality.

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